Monthly Archives: July 2013

Yuengling Traditional Lager

yuengling-traditional-lager

Yuengling is widely regarded as a “craft-y” rather than a craft brewer both because of it’s size, (over two million barrels annually) and the fact that the recipe for their Traditional Lager uses an adjunct ingredient in corn. However, given that they’ve been a family-owned brewery ever since the company was formed in 1829, and since the recipe for Traditional Lager hasn’t been changed since the late 19th century, I tend to cut them some slack. The beer is a fairly mainstream style American lager. The head is fairly weak, and the scent is of toast with honey. The middle has roasted grain and quite a bit of sweet honey. The finish is slightly metallic, and the flavor of corn peeks through here. The transitions and overall flavor profile is very smooth and mellow, but not overly watery, and the body is light to medium. It’s a really nice lager, and I enjoy it as a malty break from the hop-bombs that I normally crave. This is a good lager, and a great into to start transitioning a beginning beer drinking away from the macro world.

I give it a 4 out of 5.

Samuel Adams Belgian Session

samuel-adams-belgian-session

Another from this year’s Sam Adams summer variety pack is Belgian Session, a Belgian-style pale ale. The head is nice and creamy, and doesn’t fade too quickly. The nose is malty, with toffee and a hint of Belgian yeast in the background. The middle has banana esters and some traditional Belgian spices, particularly coriander. The finish has some caramel and orange, and a little lemon zest. All in all, a very decent Belgian Pale Ale.

I give it a 3.5 out of 5.

Chimay Tripel (White)

chimay-tripel

I’ve previously reviewed several of Chimay’s other offerings, but the tripel is by far the hardest to find (and to find in good condition) so I’m happy that I’m finally getting a chance to report on it. I love Belgians, I love Chimay, and this is no exception. As a Tripel, it’s not as big and heavy and fruity as my favorite Chimay, Grande Réserve, which is a strong dark ale, but it’s still no lightweight. The nose is full of yeast and sweet pears. The middle is tart oranges and more lovely delicate pear. The finish is heavy, syrupy, and a bit boozy with some oaky bitterness right at very end. This is a marvelous, delicious treat, fruity and complex and a brilliant example of the style. One of my favorites for sure.

I give it a 4.8 out of 5.